Suspending social media use during family law disputes

Esp Kreuzer Cores LLP

Sometimes the divorce process inspires an understandable need to vent. Venting can be both cathartic and healthy. But it is critical that should you need to vent about your former spouse that you choose to do so away from social media and the Internet in general. The subject of social media and divorce is becoming increasingly complex. But as more and more divorce attorneys seek to obtain damning evidence about others via the Internet, your best policy is to stay away from social media during your divorce, child custody battle or other family law dispute.

Ideally, it is best to temporarily shut down your accounts on Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare and other social media sites. Doing so may feel temporarily isolating, but by doing so you insulate yourself from potential liability based on activity on these accounts. Even something so harmless as “checking in” at a nice restaurant for your birthday might be perceived by opposing counsel and the court as evidence that you tend to spend money frivolously, which could impact the terms of your eventual divorce, child custody and child support agreements.

If you do not choose to shut down your social media accounts, then please approach their use with extreme caution. Avoid discussing your former spouse, your love life, your spending and travel habits and any other topic that could potentially impact your current family law proceedings.

Social media can serve as a great connector to friends, family, professional colleagues and individuals with similar interests. However, it can also impact your ability to secure the divorce or child custody agreement you deserve. Please consider temporarily shutting down social media accounts during your family law dispute or choose to approach continued use with conscious caution.

Source: CBS Philly, “Expert: Close Social Media Accounts When Going Through A Divorce,” Ian Bush, Jan. 13, 2013

Continue Reading:
Suspending social media use during family law disputes